Design Science – Kiriata’s Visual Attention Analysis Solution

VAS Feature Heatmap

What if you could predict what people are likely to see first?

3-5 seconds. That’s the amount of time that decides whether a design, product or advertisement will be noticed or lost amongst competitors. What if you could predict what people are likely to see in those critical seconds? And use that knowledge to make informed choices that support your marketing and advertising objectives?

MacBook-Gold-FrontVAS

What is Visual Attention Analysis?

Visual Attention Analysis is a reporting solution that uses predictive algorithms, based on actual eye-tracking studies, to test for pre-attentive vision. This is the first 3-5 seconds of viewing — before we’re aware of what we’re looking at — and not affected by gender, age or culture.

Kiriata’s Visual Attention Analysis Solution analyses your designs and campaigns, utilising our extensive design knowledge as well as algorithms developed by 3M scientists – simulating what people see during the first 3-5 seconds of viewing.

How does Visual Attention Analysis work?

You provide us your creative work (JPG, PNG, BMP, AI, EPS, INDD or PDF) or website address and advise us of what areas of interest (AOIs) correspond with your visual and marketing priorities. We review your content and provide an independent analysis that shows the likelihood of each area gaining attention in the first 3-5 seconds, as well as recommendations aligned with your priorities.

What can I expect from an analysis?

Kiriata provides a detailed Visual Attention Analysis report with guidance based on your specific needs. Our reporting provides analysis across a number of testing methodologies including Heatmap, Regions of Attention, Eye Fixation Sequencing, Areas of Interest and Visual Elements Analysis as well as recommendations on each of these elements from experienced designers and strategists.

What can I use Visual Attention Analysis for?

The practical uses of Visual Attention Analysis are limitless. Evaluate a single design, compare two or more designs for effectiveness or measure how a design campaign stacks up against a direct competitor.

If it can be viewed it can be tested for effectiveness. We have the ability to analyse 2D visuals such as print and digital ads, store shelf planograms and point of sale displays, billboards, websites, corporate brochureware and stationary, EDM’s and mockups, as well as 3D visuals such as external and internal photography, store layouts and even 3D conceptual architectural designs  and branded environments prior to development. Just some of the applications include:

  • Making better budget decisions with effective design.
  • Testing designs to ensure they meet campaign requirements.
  • Formulating and tuning brand and visual identity for recall.
  • Comparing and adjusting designs during design development.
  • Understanding the visual impact of packaging design.
  • Providing recommendations and approvals with scientific analysis.
  • Recommending product positioning and environmental scenarios prior to building.
  • Determining signage and way-finding impact, placement and positioning.
  • Many, many more….

We help you increase the effectiveness of exposure, provide confidence in decision making, and assist to determine visual priorities.

Many Companies use Visual Attention Analysis everyday.VASUsedByLogos

Analysis in Action.

Scenario: Which Design Concept to choose?

The marketing manager for a retail clothing store chain is tasked with launching an in-store promotional campaign. The objective of the campaign is to bring attention to Backpacks as a new accessory line through the use of hanging window displays to be rolled out across all retail locations. Campaign essentials are the use of a product shot, model and product line name.

From the brief one design layout is chosen with two variations available, but which one of these two variations (Concept 1 & 2) will command the most attention in store? Let’s walk through a Visual Attention Analysis below to discover.

Visual Attention Analysis - Concept Comparison

Heatmap Analysis

Heatmap Analysis graphically represents the likely distribution of visual attention during pre-attentive processing, giving you a quick read on the most attention- getting areas within your image.

Just like a weather map, hot colours indicate attention grabbing power in the first 3-5 seconds of viewing an image or video.

Red areas are most likely to attract attention (70% to 99%), followed by Yellow/Orange areas (40% to 69%), and Blue areas (20% to 39%).

Areas that have no colour overlay are unlikely to attract visual attention.

VASPoster_HeatmapNumbered

Analysis: From the example we can see that Concept 1 and Concept 2 share very similar Heatmap's with respect to visual attention. This is due in part to both the subjects being placed on a neutral background with distinct block colours that draw attention, as well as facial recognition. What is evident is that Concept 2 possesses a slightly larger and denser hot zone that consumes our targeted subject matter (Backpacks).

Regions of Attention Analysis

Regions of Attention Analysis graphically represents the likely distribution of visual attention during pre-attentive processing.

Each region has a numeric score, predicting the probability a person will look somewhere within the region when they first glance at the image. The reported percentage is the highest score for any area/object within the region.

Each region also possesses a coloured outline. Red outlines indicate the highest probability of attracting attention (70% to 99%), followed by Yellow outlines (40% to 69%), and finally Blue outlines (20% to 39%).

VASPoster_RegionsNumbered

Analysis: From the example we can see the differences that Concept 1 and Concept 2 possess with respect to Regions of Attention. In Concept 1 our subject (model) wears a black shirt which consumes the entire region of attention. Concept 2 provides two distinct regions of attention due to the fact that our subject is wearing a shirt colour which is similar to the background - splitting the visual plane and drawing our attention to the subject matter (Backpacks). We also begin to identify the distractive effect that mounting fixtures (clips) may have on attention, and it may be suggested that an alternate mounting system be used in store.

Eye Fixation Sequencing

Eye Fixation Sequencing indicates the first 4 most likely eye fixation points, in their respective order. All areas or objects identified (1 through 4) are considered highly likely to be noticed at first glance.

Sequential numbers show the likely order in which visual elements will gain attention in the first 3-5 seconds. Similar to eye tracking technology, Eye Fixation Sequencing allows us to understand the path we take when processing an image.

VASPoster_SequenceNumbered

Analysis: From the example we can see the differences that Concept 1 and Concept 2 possess with respect to Eye Fixation Sequencing. In Concept 1 our subject (model) wears clothing that dominates how we sequence the image, causing us to neglect the subject matter and focus on clothing. Concept 2 on the other hand has effectively orientated us to the subject matter (Backpacks) as well as the product. It is important to note that it is human nature to fixate on faces in the first instance as a preference.

Areas of Interest Analysis

Areas of Interest Analysis provides specific results for areas and objects identified as a priority prior to analysing an image or media item.

Scores indicate the percentile probability of each area gaining attention in the first 3-5 seconds of viewing, with the reported number being the highest score for any area/object within the region.

Each region also possesses a coloured outline. Red outlines indicate the highest probability of attracting attention (70% to 99%), followed by Yellow outlines (40% to 69%), and finally Blue outlines (20% to 39%).

VASPoster_AreasofInterestNumbered

Analysis: From the example we can see that although both concepts have strong Area's of Interest, Concept 2 has a higher scorecard based on the areas prioritised by the client to support their marketing goal. Concept 2 provides an 11% increase over Concept 1 to orientate us to the subject matter (Backpacks) as well as a 5% increase within orientating us to the product.

Visual Elements Analysis

Visual Elements Analysis identifies 5 visual elements – Edges, Intensity, Red-Green Contrast, Blue-Yellow Contrast and Faces, that science has proven attract peoples attention when they first glance at an image or scene, but before they are aware of what we’re looking at.

These elements act as markers, telling our vision system that important information might exist there, and increase the probability we will switch to process them.

A Data Table is provided that shows visual element scores for each of your highlighted Areas of Interest, allowing designers to tune and modify artworks and images to boost effectiveness.

VASPoster_VisualElementsNumbered1

Analysis: The use of a strong block colour (Model's dark shirt) ramps the Intensity presented for Concept 1 which in turn commands far too much of the viewers pre-attentive vision, detracting from the subject matter of the campaign. If Concept 1 remained a preference, a designer may need to tune the image to focus attention.

Find out More.

How can we help?

Visual Attention Analysis provides businesses with valuable insight and the ability to save time and money by streamlining there marketing and creative processes.

If you would like more information, or to arrange for a Visual Attention Analysis on one of your designs or campaigns, please get in touch.

Comment

This post doesn't have any comment. Be the first one!

hide comments
ShareTw.Fb.Pin.
...

This is a unique website which will require a more modern browser to work!

Please upgrade today!